From Seoul with Love!

I am currently in Seoul, South Korea, on assignment to film a documentary. I thought it would be a good idea to completely immerse myself in the beautiful culture and vibrancy of this massive city, and, use that to create some compelling images through the “lens of my eyes”. Over the next couple of weeks join me on a conceptual art documentation of Seoul.

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On Self-Development - An Artist at 30, Critiques on his 25 years old Self

5 years is a long time to fit into one article’s read, but a growing itch since the last 2 weeks of February has succeeded in influencing me to at least attempt this article. You can expect a lot of drama that is infused with great stories of dangerous adventures, soul-stirring romance, and spirited heroism in this entry…

Just kidding.

The past 5 years has seen me live through a great deal of achievements and disappointments in the crazy world of art and photography. Of course, in reality, I have not been a photographer for just 5 years only. I bought my first camera, the Canon EOS 50D, many years before that. I am taking into consideration only the past 5 years, starting from the time I had started HyperFrontal Productions (a photography and video services company), because, according to me, that was the point when I had really turned into a “true-blue professional”. In other words, that was when “**** got real”. So, for those of you who have grown disinterested in my article already thinking that it is going to be a long rant or nothing of value, don’t cut me out just yet. What I am going to be sharing about is how 5 years worth of experience has, today, made me more aware about my abilities as an artist and photographer, and, has helped me learn how to make better decisions for my work.

With Filmmaker Sarah Howell - One of my first few Portrait shoots

With Filmmaker Sarah Howell - One of my first few Portrait shoots

STARTING UP - WAS IT THAT EASY?

Incorporating a business was the easy part, but knowing what to do next was the big question that I, admittedly, didn’t have the answer to. Many articles out there tell you to have a business plan that reflects your current financial state and projects where you want your business to be in 3, 5 and 10 years. I had nothing like that on paper. I swiftly started to work on my logo and website and, ‘Voila!’, HyperFrontal Productions was created!

A fancy website and a creative logo only got me so far. There were no new jobs coming in and something didn’t feel right about all this being so easy. I started reading up more articles and photography related YouTube channels to learn more and realized that I had barely scratched the surface.

According to Dane Sanders in his book Fast Track Photographer: In the 1st year, 60% of photographers give up their business. Of that remaining 40%, another 25% will fail within the 2nd year. The ones that make it are the remaining 15% who endure through the 3rd year.

https://www.colesclassroom.com/why-photographers-fail-how-to-succeed/

As creative folks, what some (or most) of us do not realize from the beginning is that being good at what you do is not enough. You still need a shrewd business acumen to take you to the next level. Despite all the resources available online to help me, I willingly chose to do things my way which sent me on a journey of questionable decisions and unnecessary expenditure that never got me closer to my goals - all of which could have been avoided.

Image from my First In-studio Portrait shoot

Image from my First In-studio Portrait shoot

LEARNING NEVER STOPS

Research and Development are two key factors that should never stop if you are in the pursuit of success. In one of my favorite reads, “Photographers and Research: The Role of Research in Contemporary Photographic Practice” authors Shirley Read and Mike Simmons suggested that doing research is one of the pillars of developing and furthering skills as a photographer. This would be something I would apply as a staple principle.

Being an avid reader meant that reading came naturally for me because it was something I enjoyed very much. So an effort was made to align my hobby of reading with researching on photography. I started purchasing many photography books and swallowed them whole! Some of my favorite books that I recommend you to check out are:

1) Gregory Heisler: 50 Portraits - An inspirational book on the creative processes of Gregory Heisler while taking readers through a plethora of important assignments.

2) Stunning Digital Photography by Tony Northrup - The #1 photography e-book on Amazon with over 100,000 readers authored by popular photography educators and YouTubers, Tony and Chelsea Northrup.

3) A Photographer's Life: 1990-2005 by Annie Leibovitz - Famed photographer, Annie Leibovitz, publishes a book that contrasts her glitzy and glamorous work-life with that of her personal life.

Through such books, I was able to understand the ropes even better. I, as a matter of a fact, began to realize that I had stepped into the industry with the wrong idea - chasing fame or money was not the way to do it. Excellence was the key and to achieve that I needed to step down from my high-horse and put all my readings into practice.

Image from Assignment with actor/ model Fei Chua

Image from Assignment with actor/ model Fei Chua

Practice versus Over-working - The Death of HyperFrontal Productions

It is an obvious fact that you need to put in the time to get to where you want to be. Steve McCurry did not just wake up one day with National Geographic flying him all over the world. He too had to put in his fair share of time and effort into practicing his craft.

My area of interest, from portraiture, started to lean towards more abstract, conceptual/ surrealist and story-telling work. By this time, I had already moved on to having better equipment, and, after years of investing on such equipment and building a contact base of like-minded creative folks, I took the plunge into the unforgiving world of fine art photography.

It was a rocky start at the beginning given that I had so many ideas and so much inspiration flowing out of me. The act of practicing should never be confused with over-working and over-spending (both of which I was famous for). I was spending way too much time conceptualizing my own projects and too much money on booking studios that I had forgotten that I was running a business too. This would be catalytic in the eventual, and inevitable, DEATH of HyperFrontal Productions.

Image from my first Fine Art project called, Intentions, in 2016.

Image from my first Fine Art project called, Intentions, in 2016.

Making my Comeback

Surely, running a business down to the ground indicated that I was not meant for business, right? Wrong. If Donald Trump could “fake” a comeback from major financial setbacks with a Television show (The Apprentice), why, then, could I not make a genuine return to the business of photography? Surely, stories of comebacks aren’t just reserved for “celebrities”?

In late-2017, I decided that no matter what the result may be, I should at least attempt a comeback. Unlike when starting up HyperFrontal Productions, never once did I feel that this was easy. My financial blunders had, also, cost me family and friends so it felt more lonelier than ever before (to their credit, some people did reconnect with me again). However, what I did find “easier” was answering the question; what I am supposed to do next. Perhaps, this was because I had experienced failure before and this time I knew what to do to avoid it.

Image from my best-selling photo-series called, The Ratirahasya.

Image from my best-selling photo-series called, The Ratirahasya.

SUMMARY

Whenever I look back at all the experiences I collected over the years, a sense of gratitude comforts my mind and eases away all the doubts and regrets. I have learned to continue to grow and develop to be a better version of myself. The real failure is not in experiencing failure, but, in negligently taking that downward spiral into the dark abyss of self-loathing. The 30 years old me congratulates the younger me for all my failures because, today, I am a better Artist and Photographer.

My 5 Goals for 2019 and why I will SMASH them!

When I create a list of goals for myself or my business, I treat them as challenges that I MUST overcome to progress ahead. It drives me to focus on living purposefully and keeps things exciting and fresh for me. I am of the opinion that there is no such thing as “the right time will come” or that artists in general need to “wait for the correct signs”. The only right time for me is NOW and the only right signs I need are the ones that keep me alive enough to work another day. So, here are my 5 goals for 2019, and, as bonus content, I will be sharing more on why I will definitely SMASH all of them!

1) Meaningful Collaborations

Much like many other portrait photographers, I have a portfolio filled with beauty and aesthetic portraits. A lot of these projects were collaborations and, without the intention of sounding offensive towards all the women I have worked with, they mostly lack depth. I, also, observed that besides more likes and followers, such work was not doing much for me in terms of progressing on.

I spent the second-half of 2018 disciplining myself in the area of collaborations; - if the potential work did not project a meaningful outcome, I would not take it on. This is something I am applying to 2019 as well. I will be concentrating on paid work and collaborations that either has a cause or the power to create social impact.

I am already starting the year with a project called, Shadows and Mirrors, which is based on sexual assault and features, Devika Panicker, spokesperson for AWARE SINGAPORE. I believe that in starting the new year with a project that is in-line with my goals, I will be setting the tone right for the rest of the year as well. Shadows and Mirrors will be screened privately on the 18th of January 2019 and will most likely be out for public viewing several days after that.

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2) Meaningful Projects

It goes without saying that meaningful collaborations will lead to meaningful projects. It could be simple portraiture work or a project with a high-concept, whatever it may be, the project needs to be aligned with my identity as a fine art photographer. The responsibility is on me to either produce or take on projects that will further endorse my brand of photography art.

In the middle of December 2018, Serene Martin, owner of Serenity Secrets, and myself came to consensus that we have a lot to gain from each other through a business partnership. What got to me was the opportunity to turn her words in to pieces of photographic art. Together we are planning out a year’s worth of content that is conceived by Serene and created by me.

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Therefore, for 2019, I am on the hunt for opportunities that will allow me to show to a wider audience the power of what my brand of photography can do rather than churn out usual work that any other artist or photographer can create as well.

3) Long-term Business Relationships versus Short-term Monetary Gains

Establishing long-term business relationships is a tricky one. It comes down to the negotiating prowess of the offering party. If there is one thing I have learnt from the failure of HyperFrontal Productions, it is to never let go of a client so easily especially when there are “a hundred-and-one” photography and video service providers out there.

What I bring to the table for businesses like Dragnet Smartech Security and The Fesique Lab is my unique focus on content over cost. I rather charge a monthly fee than a giant sum at one go. This keeps the business I am contracted with away from being financially strained just because they had acquired my services and keeps communication going between me and them. I do not invoice according to volume because then I am restricting myself from providing any value-added services but rather determine a pricing based on the longevity and complexity of the assignment. The determined sum is then divided into an affordable monthly fee. It may seem easier to many people to collect a one or two-time payment but what happens after that cannot be projected. This uncertainty is something I would like to stay away from for this brand new year of 2019.

4) Acquiring Funding

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In my time of running a business and being involved in several other businesses, I have learnt that the one thing that keeps potential investors away from funding a business is the uncertainty of the future of the business. You may make one million dollars over the next 6 months but if you have no idea what you are going to do with all that profit and, worst still, if you have no idea what happens after that 6 months, your business starts losing credibility despite the high returns you made in that 6 months.

Art has its prominent position in my life but cultivating purposeful projections of the future and strategic partnerships in the present is my goal where the more business side of Bedtime Tales Inc. is concerned. For the year of 2019, progression should come with growth and for that to happen seeking funding is quintessential.

5) Awards and Portfolio reviews

Thus far, we have pretty much concentrated on Art (meaningful collaborations and projects) and Business (meaningful partnerships and funding). However, I am an artist at the end of the day and to fuel my determination, I will need loads of motivation.

_a body of work that has distinct political and social relevance in this day and age_.png

I have always found sending my work to award festivals to greatly motivate me and this is without the expectation of winning or receiving 5-star reviews. My career as a fine art photographer has seen many highs and lows but one of the most encouraging events is when I receive positive reviews from major photography art festivals and organisations from all over the world.

I, therefore, will be dedicating more time to sending my work out for the world to see and, hopefully, appreciate them. In return, I know that it is going to charge me up to smash all the goals I set for myself for 2019.

Conclusion

It can be observed that my goals are interdependent where one cannot be achieved without first achieving the other. I am of the opinion that goals should be set in a progressive manner to help climb the overall ladder of success. Of course, what I have listed here are unique to me and my business and I am not asking fellow artists and photographers to take anything I write as principles written into stone; nothing that I write in my other articles should be taken in such light as well. I project my excitement and eagerness to work in hopes that it may resonate with other artists and photographers out there and if it inspires them to work a little harder (or smarter) then I would feel that I have done my part to contribute to an industry that I love.