The Importance of seeking out Critiques - An evening of learning with Jose Jeuland

While penning down my next project, Culture X, I could not help but ask myself if I really was good enough to take it up a notch with a project like that. The fact that this question was lingering around in my mind, distracting me from my research, made me feel that I needed to speak to someone about it.

Poster taken from www.josejeuland.com

Poster taken from www.josejeuland.com

I reached out to renowned documentary and travel photographer, Jose Jeuland, whom I have been following on social media to know if I could get some words of advice from him. Jose, whose work has been featured on far too many platforms for me to mention given my word limit for this article, is a FUJIFILM ambassador, and is supported by BenQ, Manfrotto, Epson and Gravity Backdrops. He was, at that time, running an exhibition in Singapore titled, “Longevity Okinawa”, which had on display portraits of Okinawans aged between 89 to 106 taken by him.     

Why would someone like myself, who has spent nearly a decade taking photographs through various assignments and personal projects, need the opinion of another photographer? Consider the following:

  1. It could be an opportunity to experience something new.

    Of course, it is always satisfying to hear compliments but learning comes from knowing what is lacking in our work. The varying opinions of another keen-eyed photographer can help with giving different perspectives and with singling out mistakes made that can be avoided in other assignments or projects.

    Jose used a large-screened BenQ display to review a collection of my edited photographs. I was blown away at how much detail (and mistakes) in those photographs I had not noticed before. Through using the large display, Jose was able to make it obvious to me how I have a tendency of over-processing some of my photographs. While he maintained that different people tend to have different styles and preferences, the white halo-like lines that appear on the edges of the subject in the photograph (a sign of an over-processing) can be very distracting on print which is why he uses such a large screen to identify such issues in photographs before they are printed out.

    While I have heard countless times about the sheer joy of editing on a large screen I have never gotten to experience it on my own. Thus, in this case, right at the very beginning of the workshop, I already had the pleasure of experiencing something new.

  2. Critique sessions and workshops are not just about criticizing your work.

    To Critique” and “to Criticize” mean two different things altogether.

    An often forgotten fact is that professional photographers are not going to dedicate their time to critique your work just so that they can bash it. They could be spending that same amount of time working on a project or resting up before their next assignment.

    It is important to bear in mind that if a professional photographer puts in the effort to give you his or her time, it only means that they are passionate about imparting their knowledge. Throughout the workshop, Jose repeatedly mentioned that there is no right or wrong and that his critiques are based on his personal point of view which can vary from person to person. He also asked me for some background story or context and then proceeded to give his critique for each photograph. He emphasized on, not just the things that did not work in the photographs, but also on what worked. In addition to that, never once did he see the need to say something negative and, instead, shared how he would have taken the photographs which offered me a different perspective to consider.

    It is never about someone else trying to impose their opinions, especially in the case of professionals who would know how to conduct themselves respectfully. Therefore, if you approach the right people and attend the session/ workshop with an open-mind, chances are that you will definitely enjoy the process!

  3. It is a great opportunity to get some Pro-tips on the business of photography as well.

    While there are many ways to acquire ideas and tips from professional photographers, I am of the opinion that the best way would be to speak to them personally. It is a sincere and direct way of communication that does not risk you looking like you have an agenda.

    At the end of the workshop, Jose and I spent a while more discussing assignments, business and sponsorships that would assist in running projects smoothly. The grand take-away of it all was that nothing can replace good work as that is what industry-giants are going to take note of first but there are many things in between that can be done to put ourselves out there in a more professional light that could help the process.


I, personally, regard myself as a photographer who has only just started the professional stage of his career and while I do believe in hard work, that alone, is not going to help me sustain a successful professional career. Everything I have covered boils down to one simple thing: Learning. There is no point in doing something the same way over and over again if it does not get you the desired results. I am glad that right before the beginning of my dream project, Culture X, I was able to regain my confidence and that is my biggest gain from seeking out Jose Jeuland’s critiques.

We’re all Artists; learning never ever stops for us!

My 5 Goals for 2019 and why I will SMASH them!

When I create a list of goals for myself or my business, I treat them as challenges that I MUST overcome to progress ahead. It drives me to focus on living purposefully and keeps things exciting and fresh for me. I am of the opinion that there is no such thing as “the right time will come” or that artists in general need to “wait for the correct signs”. The only right time for me is NOW and the only right signs I need are the ones that keep me alive enough to work another day. So, here are my 5 goals for 2019, and, as bonus content, I will be sharing more on why I will definitely SMASH all of them!

1) Meaningful Collaborations

Much like many other portrait photographers, I have a portfolio filled with beauty and aesthetic portraits. A lot of these projects were collaborations and, without the intention of sounding offensive towards all the women I have worked with, they mostly lack depth. I, also, observed that besides more likes and followers, such work was not doing much for me in terms of progressing on.

I spent the second-half of 2018 disciplining myself in the area of collaborations; - if the potential work did not project a meaningful outcome, I would not take it on. This is something I am applying to 2019 as well. I will be concentrating on paid work and collaborations that either has a cause or the power to create social impact.

I am already starting the year with a project called, Shadows and Mirrors, which is based on sexual assault and features, Devika Panicker, spokesperson for AWARE SINGAPORE. I believe that in starting the new year with a project that is in-line with my goals, I will be setting the tone right for the rest of the year as well. Shadows and Mirrors will be screened privately on the 18th of January 2019 and will most likely be out for public viewing several days after that.

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2) Meaningful Projects

It goes without saying that meaningful collaborations will lead to meaningful projects. It could be simple portraiture work or a project with a high-concept, whatever it may be, the project needs to be aligned with my identity as a fine art photographer. The responsibility is on me to either produce or take on projects that will further endorse my brand of photography art.

In the middle of December 2018, Serene Martin, owner of Serenity Secrets, and myself came to consensus that we have a lot to gain from each other through a business partnership. What got to me was the opportunity to turn her words in to pieces of photographic art. Together we are planning out a year’s worth of content that is conceived by Serene and created by me.

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Therefore, for 2019, I am on the hunt for opportunities that will allow me to show to a wider audience the power of what my brand of photography can do rather than churn out usual work that any other artist or photographer can create as well.

3) Long-term Business Relationships versus Short-term Monetary Gains

Establishing long-term business relationships is a tricky one. It comes down to the negotiating prowess of the offering party. If there is one thing I have learnt from the failure of HyperFrontal Productions, it is to never let go of a client so easily especially when there are “a hundred-and-one” photography and video service providers out there.

What I bring to the table for businesses like Dragnet Smartech Security and The Fesique Lab is my unique focus on content over cost. I rather charge a monthly fee than a giant sum at one go. This keeps the business I am contracted with away from being financially strained just because they had acquired my services and keeps communication going between me and them. I do not invoice according to volume because then I am restricting myself from providing any value-added services but rather determine a pricing based on the longevity and complexity of the assignment. The determined sum is then divided into an affordable monthly fee. It may seem easier to many people to collect a one or two-time payment but what happens after that cannot be projected. This uncertainty is something I would like to stay away from for this brand new year of 2019.

4) Acquiring Funding

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In my time of running a business and being involved in several other businesses, I have learnt that the one thing that keeps potential investors away from funding a business is the uncertainty of the future of the business. You may make one million dollars over the next 6 months but if you have no idea what you are going to do with all that profit and, worst still, if you have no idea what happens after that 6 months, your business starts losing credibility despite the high returns you made in that 6 months.

Art has its prominent position in my life but cultivating purposeful projections of the future and strategic partnerships in the present is my goal where the more business side of Bedtime Tales Inc. is concerned. For the year of 2019, progression should come with growth and for that to happen seeking funding is quintessential.

5) Awards and Portfolio reviews

Thus far, we have pretty much concentrated on Art (meaningful collaborations and projects) and Business (meaningful partnerships and funding). However, I am an artist at the end of the day and to fuel my determination, I will need loads of motivation.

_a body of work that has distinct political and social relevance in this day and age_.png

I have always found sending my work to award festivals to greatly motivate me and this is without the expectation of winning or receiving 5-star reviews. My career as a fine art photographer has seen many highs and lows but one of the most encouraging events is when I receive positive reviews from major photography art festivals and organisations from all over the world.

I, therefore, will be dedicating more time to sending my work out for the world to see and, hopefully, appreciate them. In return, I know that it is going to charge me up to smash all the goals I set for myself for 2019.

Conclusion

It can be observed that my goals are interdependent where one cannot be achieved without first achieving the other. I am of the opinion that goals should be set in a progressive manner to help climb the overall ladder of success. Of course, what I have listed here are unique to me and my business and I am not asking fellow artists and photographers to take anything I write as principles written into stone; nothing that I write in my other articles should be taken in such light as well. I project my excitement and eagerness to work in hopes that it may resonate with other artists and photographers out there and if it inspires them to work a little harder (or smarter) then I would feel that I have done my part to contribute to an industry that I love.